• ALSM at Home Cambria County

    Care at Home

    807 Goucher Street
    Johnstown, PA 15905

  • ALSM at Home Blair County

    Care at Home

    913 Spruce Street
    Hollidaysburg, PA 16648

  • Early Head Start

    Children & Family

    231 South Juliana Street
    Bedford, PA 15522

  • Head Start

    Children & Family

    231 South Juliana Street
    Bedford, PA 15522

  • ALSM at Home Somerset County

    Care at Home

    231 Tabernacle Drive
    Somerset, PA 15501

  • Lutheran Commons at Pleasant Gap

    Residential Living

    400 Rhoads Drive
    Pleasant Gap, PA 16823

  • Lutheran Commons at Berlin Pike

    Residential Living

    443 Berlin Pike Road
    Somerset, PA 15501

  • The Oaks at Pleasant Gap

    Residential Living

    200 Rachael Drive
    Pleasant Gap, PA 16823

  • The Lutheran Home at Johnstown

    Residential Living

    807 Goucher Street
    Johnstown, PA 15905

  • The Lutheran Home at Hollidaysburg

    Residential Living

    916 Hickory Street
    Hollidaysburg, PA 16648

  • Somerset Senior Daily Living Center

    Community Services

    231 Tabernacle Drive
    Somerset, PA 15501

  • Altoona Senior Daily Living Center

    Community Services

    701 Quail Avenue
    Altoona, PA 16602

  • Allegheny Lutheran Social Ministries Administrative Office

    Community Services

    998 Logan Blvd
    Altoona, PA 16602

  • Kid Stop – Johnstown County

    Children & Family

    675 Goucher Street
    Johnstown, PA 15905

  • Kid Stop – Everett County

    Children & Family

    165 East First Avenue
    Everett, PA 15537

  • Kid Stop – Bedford County

    Children & Family

    3639 Business Rt. 220
    Bedford, PA 15522

  • Growing Years Early Learning Center Johnstown

    Children & Family

    807 Goucher Street
    Johnstown, PA 15905

  • Growing Years Early Learning Center DuBois

    Children & Family

    Part-day service only, Pre-school classes only

    875 Sunflower Drive
    DuBois, PA 15801

  • Growing Years Early Learning Center Bedford

    Children & Family

    106 W Penn Street
    Bedford, PA 15522

  • Children’s Services – Family Center of Bedford County

    Children & Family

    231 S. Juliana Street
    Bedford, PA 15522

ALSM Locations

Allegheny Lutheran Social Ministries serves more than 3,000 people in these eight West Central Pennsylvania counties: Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Centre, Clearfield, Fulton, Huntingdon and Somerset.

  • Child & Family

    Children and Family

    ALSM offers a wide range of child and family services and programs in safe and nurturing environments that encourage children to reach their full potential.

    Learn More

  • Community Services

    Community Services

    Since 1983, ALSM has been providing community support services. Our programs and services offer ways to empower seniors or their caregivers.

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  • Care at Home

    Care at Home

    Our in-home personal care and companion services assist seniors in maintaining their independence so they are able to enjoy the best quality of life possible.

    Learn More

  • Residential Living

    Residential Living

    ALSM’s CARF accredited senior living communities offer independent living apartment, cottages, personal care and health care centers .

    Learn More

Latest News, Events & Blog

News

November 28, 2018

2018 Advent Devotional

Please click this link to download the 2018 Advent Devotional PDF or follow our daily postings of the 2018 Advent Devotional on Facebook. Greetings! It is with joyful hearts that we offer this devotional...

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News

November 21, 2018

A Thanksgiving Greeting From ALSM’s President and CEO

November 2018 Greetings, At this time of the year when mornings welcome us with “frost on the pumpkin,” the need to snuggle into our warm hats and gloves and turn on the...

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Facebook Feed

"In Germany, there is a Christmas tradition that has been lost to many in the United States. It is the coming of the fearful Krampus. This horned, devil -like creature comes in the evening of December 5th. His mission is to punish bad children by swatting them and taking them to the underworld. No child was safe from the Krampus who was known for bad behavior. The passage for today from Amos sounds similar. God is sending punishment upon those who value profit over the welfare of others. Judgement comes upon those who can’t wait for religious observances to end to return to making profit. It is clear that those who follow a path in pursuit of wealth over all else will not escape God’s righteous judgement.

If this was all of the story, we would be left without much joy. However, December 6th in Germany is St. Nicholas Day. Children wake early to see if St. Nicholas left them a present as a reward. From the fear of the night comes the light of day and the anticipation of good things to come. For Israel the judgement upon the wayward was balanced by the lifting up and preservation of the faithful. Those who lived in faith did not need to fear God.

While most of us no longer fear the Krampus, we do know what it is like to fear the darkness that overshadows life and the trepidation of the unknown. Yet Christmas Day reminds us there is something good waiting for us. In the midst of the day’s business and celebration, we lift up the reassurance of God love and mercy. Jesus the Christ has been born and the darkness of life is gone. He shines as a beacon of shelter and a light to guide our lives in the path of faith.

Prayer: Holy God, thanks be to you for freeing us from fear. May we see your son always before us calling us to the shelter of your loving arms. In Christ’s precious name we pray. Amen."

Mrs. April Lauver
Director of Nursing
The Lutheran Home at Hollidaysburg
Allegheny Lutheran Social Ministries

www.alsm.org/wp-content/uploads/Devotional2018.pdf
... See MoreSee Less

In Germany, there is a Christmas tradition that has been lost to many in the United States.  It is the coming of the fearful Krampus.  This horned, devil -like creature comes in the evening of December 5th.  His mission is to punish bad children by swatting them and taking them to the underworld.  No child was safe from the Krampus who was known for bad behavior.  The passage for today from Amos sounds similar.  God is sending punishment upon those who value profit over the welfare of others.  Judgement comes upon those who can’t wait for religious observances to end to return to making profit.  It is clear that those who follow a path in pursuit of wealth over all else will not escape God’s righteous judgement.If this was all of the story, we would be left without much joy. However, December 6th in Germany is St. Nicholas Day.  Children wake early to see if St. Nicholas left them a present as a reward.  From the fear of the night comes the light of day and the anticipation of good things to come.   For Israel the judgement upon the wayward was balanced by the lifting up and preservation of the faithful.  Those who lived in faith did not need to fear God.While most of us no longer fear the Krampus, we do know what it is like to fear the darkness that overshadows life and the trepidation of the unknown.  Yet Christmas Day reminds us there is something good waiting for us.  In the midst of the day’s business and celebration, we lift up the reassurance of God love and mercy.  Jesus the Christ has been born and the darkness of life is gone.  He shines as a beacon of shelter and a light to guide our lives in the path of faith.Prayer: Holy God, thanks be to you for freeing us from fear.  May we see your son always before us calling us to the shelter of your loving arms.  In Christ’s precious name we pray.  Amen.Mrs. April Lauver
Director of Nursing
The Lutheran Home at Hollidaysburg
Allegheny Lutheran Social Ministrieshttps://www.alsm.org/wp-content/uploads/Devotional2018.pdf

Principal Ms. Turkovich has been busy visiting the ALSM preschool classrooms within Bedford Elementary School. Here she is with the children from the Pre-K Counts classroom. The children had big smiles when she came to visit! ... See MoreSee Less

Principal Ms. Turkovich has been busy visiting the ALSM preschool classrooms within Bedford Elementary School. Here she is with the children from the Pre-K Counts classroom. The children had big smiles when she came to visit!

"In this passage, we hear God (who is Love) express frustration with those who claim to be God’s people, but who are not living in God’s ways (caring for the poor, loving their neighbor, loving God). Instead, these people have no eyes except for themselves and their own comfort.

It is not that resting and having possessions are bad in and of themselves; instead it is the arrogant and apathetic attitude with which these people focus on themselves and neglect to see or acknowledge the tragedy around them. The city is lying in ruins all around, and yet they seem to have no compassion for others, concern for their community, or a sense of loss that they are no longer living in God’s ways. These people are more concerned with eating feasts, having luxury belongings and accommodations, and wheedling away their time on nothing, but relaxing and personal (mindless?) entertainment.

During Advent, we are called to “prepare” for the Lord. Part of the preparation of Advent is to “wake up” to hear God’s call, to see the others around us, and actually take part in the healing of the world, rather than be dismissive of its violence and injustice. This is hard to focus on, when what we’d prefer to do is set aside the realities of the suffering world in order to have a happy holiday. It is also difficult not to focus on acquiring more luxuries, when retailers all around us at this time of year would have us believe that we need to buy more for our children, grandchildren, and other family members (to give them the Christmas they really want), and maybe even buy a few things for ourselves while we are out (because don’t we really deserve it after all that hard work of shopping?). But how might God feel about these things, when we are more worried about our entertainment and creature-comforts than we are about God’s children around us who are in the ruin of poverty, violence, food insecurity, and fear?

While this is a challenge to consider (Amos does not exactly present a ‘happy’ Advent text) and even harder to do, it is hopeful for the world, in that we can be reminded of what God’s priorities are, and become part of God’s work to make things more as God wants them to be.

The child who comes to the manger, and who grows up to go to the cross, shows us how our lives are to be lived for others, rather than just for ourselves. This Advent, may the Holy Spirit move in our hearts to help us not just prepare for one day of celebration, but help us be about the work of preparing for God’s coming kingdom, in which love, grace, and plenty is available to all, instead of just a few.

Prayer: God of grace and compassion, you have given to us so lovingly - including the gift of yourself, in Jesus Christ. Forgive us when we become distracted by the world’s priorities and focus on acquiring more for only ourselves and the people closest to us. Work in our hearts that we might see - and attend to - those who are experiencing “ruin” in their lives. Move us out of our own comforts in order to be used as your vessels of hope and mercy. Give us courage to give in ways that really matter, and to prepare for your coming by living out your ways of sacrificial love. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen."

The Reverend Elisa Osman
Member of St. John’s Lutheran Church, Bellefonte
Chaplain at The Oaks at Pleasant Gap
Allegheny Lutheran Social Ministries

www.alsm.org/wp-content/uploads/Devotional2018.pdf
... See MoreSee Less

In this passage, we hear God (who is Love) express frustration with those who claim to be God’s people, but who are not living in God’s ways (caring for the poor, loving their neighbor, loving God).  Instead, these people have no eyes except for themselves and their own comfort.It is not that resting and having possessions are bad in and of themselves; instead it is the arrogant and apathetic attitude with which these people focus on themselves and neglect to see or acknowledge the tragedy around them.  The city is lying in ruins all around, and yet they seem to have no compassion for others, concern for their community, or a sense of loss that they are no longer living in God’s ways. These people are more concerned with eating feasts, having luxury belongings and accommodations, and wheedling away their time on nothing, but relaxing and personal (mindless?) entertainment.During Advent, we are called to “prepare” for the Lord.  Part of the preparation of Advent is to “wake up” to hear God’s call, to see the others around us, and actually take part in the healing of the world, rather than be dismissive of its violence and injustice.  This is hard to focus on, when what we’d prefer to do is set aside the realities of the suffering world in order to have a happy holiday.  It is also difficult not to focus on acquiring more luxuries, when retailers all around us at this time of year would have us believe that we need to buy more for our children, grandchildren, and other family members (to give them the Christmas they really want), and maybe even buy a few things for ourselves while we are out (because don’t we really deserve it after all that hard work of shopping?).  But how might God feel about these things, when we are more worried about our entertainment and creature-comforts than we are about God’s children around us who are in the ruin of poverty, violence, food insecurity, and fear?While this is a challenge to consider (Amos does not exactly present a ‘happy’ Advent text) and even harder to do, it is hopeful for the world, in that we can be reminded of what God’s priorities are, and become part of God’s work to make things more as God wants them to be.The child who comes to the manger, and who grows up to go to the cross, shows us how our lives are to be lived for others, rather than just for ourselves.  This Advent, may the Holy Spirit move in our hearts to help us not just prepare for one day of celebration, but help us be about the work of preparing for God’s coming kingdom, in which love, grace, and plenty is available to all, instead of just a few.Prayer: God of grace and compassion, you have given to us so lovingly - including the gift of yourself, in Jesus Christ.  Forgive us when we become distracted by the world’s priorities and focus on acquiring more for only ourselves and the people closest to us. Work in our hearts that we might see - and attend to - those who are experiencing “ruin” in their lives.  Move us out of our own comforts in order to be used as your vessels of hope and mercy.  Give us courage to give in ways that really matter, and to prepare for your coming by living out your ways of sacrificial love.  We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.The Reverend Elisa Osman
Member of St. John’s Lutheran Church, Bellefonte
Chaplain at The Oaks at Pleasant Gap
Allegheny Lutheran Social Ministrieshttps://www.alsm.org/wp-content/uploads/Devotional2018.pdf
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